Free Bipolar Documents – Which Do You Want?

Dear Readers,

I want to know what you think. Yes, you there, woman reading on your iPad. And, you, over there… the one on the iMac. And, yes, you too… the guy on the Android tablet. And, all the rest of you… the ones I didn’t mention by device.

After hanging out on forums about bipolar disorder for a few years now, I’ve come up with a few ideas for documents that I think may be really helpful for people with bipolar disorder. Many of them will be provided to subscribers of this site’s newsletter within the next few weeks because I’ve already drafted them.

But before I spend hours refining them and filling in the blanks with research, I want to run the ideas by you to see what you think. I’m really counting on you to comment or email me with your thoughts. So, please let me know!

If you don’t like the ideas (or even if you do), I am very open to hearing any suggestions you have for other offerings that would be helpful to you. Here is what I’ve come up with so far (many of them have a legal flavor because I spent over ten years as an attorney in private practice):

MEDICATION GUIDE:
List of commonly prescribed medications for bipolar disorder, how each class works, what each medication does best, what other medications are in its class, and what other users have said about that prescription (such as, “it really causes weight gain fast!” or “it worked for me after I tried everything else”)

HEALTHCARE POWER OF ATTORNEY:
Psychiatric and Healthcare Power of Attorney so that you can do more than just choose someone to make decisions for you if you become extremely manic or depressed; you can express, in advance, your wishes about electro-convulsive therapy, psychiatric institutionalization, particular medications and treatment modalities

FINANCIAL POWER OF ATTORNEY:
Financial Power of Attorney so that you can set up in advance an agent, someone of your choosing who can manage your financial affairs if you become extremely manic or depressed (or otherwise incapacitated) without requiring that your inability to manage your finances be determined in a public court hearing

LOSS OF INCOME PREPAREDNESS GUIDE:
Step-by-step manual on how to calculate Social Security Disability, sick pay and other benefits you might be entitled to if you became sick for more than a couple of weeks and needed to rely on long-term benefits. By figuring this out ahead of time, you can prepare yourself and your family to cope in case of a temporary but significant loss of your earnings due to bipolar disorder

SSDI QUALIFICATION MANUAL:
Step-by-step manual on how to apply for and win Social Security Disability Income as a person with bipolar disorder.

KETOGENIC DIET FOR MOOD STABILITY AND WEIGHT LOSS:
How to eat a ketogenic diet to eliminate depression and mania, maintain mood stability and lose weight. Other benefits include improving your cholesterol and other blood work health statistics and eliminating acne.

I would love to hear which of these you would be interested in seeing, which you wouldn’t be interested in seeing, and any other burning questions you have in the comments below or by email to B at HappierWithBipolar dot com.

And don’t forget to sign up for the newsletter!

Thank you!

2 thoughts on “Free Bipolar Documents – Which Do You Want?”

  1. Pamela Noland says:

    I have a daughter who has been in a Mental Hospital they say she is Bipolar. I am her Mother, she is over 21 and was released in my care. Twice she has stopped taking her medication and had become uncooperative. She is now back on medication and wants me to seek guardianship to assist her handling of her medical care and applying for Social Security Benefits. I would appreciate some advice of this matter and I’m not sure of who or where to turn to????

    1. You need to see an attorney or go to a legal self-help clinic to learn how to obtain guardianship in your state. In the meantime, she can sign a power of attorney to give you the authority to manage her finances for her and another to give you the authority to manage her health care. Note, however, that powers of attorney, unlike guardianships, don’t give you the right to overrule her decisions.

I'm very interested to read what you're thinking